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Last updated: July 24. 2014 7:52AM - 251 Views

Contributed photoAlligators have become fairly common in some eastern areas of the state and sightings can be frequent during the summer.
Contributed photoAlligators have become fairly common in some eastern areas of the state and sightings can be frequent during the summer.
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RALEIGH —The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding people that if you see an alligator, in most instances it is not necessary to do anything other than leave it alone.


Alligators have become fairly common in some eastern areas of the state and sightings can be frequent during the summer.


Feeding or harassing alligators is illegal in North Carolina. Feeding an alligator will cause the animal to lose its fear of people, making it more likely to approach and possibly attack someone.


“Alligators are usually quite shy and secretive,” said Jonathan Shaw, a Wildlife Commission biologist. “If you encounter an alligator, the best option is to leave it alone and give it plenty of space. Alligators typically do not stay in one area for extensive periods of time. They move considerable distances and will eventually leave on their own.”


Alligator hunting or otherwise killing an alligator is prohibited in North Carolina. Only authorized wildlife biologists and wildlife officers can remove problem alligators. To report an alligator problem, wildlife harassment or other violations, call 1-800-662-7137.


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