Hunt accused of assaulting wife

Last updated: November 29. 2013 9:30AM - 7588 Views
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RAEFORD — Tony Hunt, the tribal administrator for the Lumbee Tribe and a Hoke County commissioner, was arrested this week on charges centering around an incident with his estranged wife.


According to Hoke County Sheriff Hubert Peterkin, Hunt is charged with felonious larceny from person and misdemeanor counts of assault on a female, assault by pointing a gun, communicating threats, resist/obstruct/delay an officer and carrying a concealed weapon.


Peterkin told The Fayetteville Observer that Hunt was arrested after going to the home of his estranged wife. The couple have been separated since July. A gun was reportedly involved, but the sheriff did not give details.


The Robesonian was unable to contact Hunt. The tribal government was closed this morning.


It is unclear if Hunt was jailed for any period of time. A reporter who called the jail was told to contact the Hoke County Sheriff’s Office for any information. The Sheriff’s Office was closed today as part of the Thanksgiving holiday.


Hunt has been serving as the Lumbee Tribe’s administrator since May. He is an educator and former candidate for the position of Lumbee tribal chairman, the position now held by Paul Brooks.


“Mr. Hunt is a person who is ready to help lead and move us forward in unity to make the tribal membership proud, and has the qualities we need to make the administration more accountable,” Brooks said at the time of Hunt’s appointment.


This is the second time in a week that Lumbee tribal officials have had to defend themselves on charges that they violated the law.


On Monday, District Court Judge Herbert L. Richardson told tribal officials to behave, saying if they do so then assault charges against Brooks by Councilwoman Louise Mitchell will not be heard in court.


Mitchell on Nov. 18 filed assault charges against Brooks, claiming that he “grabbed her arm, clothing and pushed” her as she attempted in her position as council secretary to post an ordinance for public review at the tribe’s administration complex, better known as The Turtle, on N.C. 711. Brooks admits to a confrontation, but says there was no assault.


According to the agreement, only individuals necessary for the day-to-day operations of the Lumbee government and groundskeepers are to be at The Turtle, the tribe’s administrative office complex on N.C. 711 just outside of Pembroke. If council members have business that needs to be conducted with tribal administration, they must contact the administration through an appointed liaison.


The agreement specifically prohibits any contact between the Mitchell and Brooks; says there are to be no derogatory comments from either party; and bans them from speaking to the media about the case.

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